3 Areas Where Autism Awareness Matters

Working parents with Special education Special needs children including Autism ADHD Learning disabilities  Employee benefits Employee assistance Employee support Voluntary benefits. 504 Plan, IEP Program

April.  Autism Awareness Month...30 days of focus on autism spectrum disorders.  A good thing for those who need to learn more about it.  Yet for families living it every day, there's another need.  Planning.

1.  School

To effectively advocate for your child in school, understanding the diagnosis is important.  Yet what's essential is understanding your child's individual needs.

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is not one thing, but encompasses many things and each child is unique.  While there are definitely similarities in terms of areas of need, the diagnosis does not automatically correlate to their placement in school. 

Many children/teens with an autism spectrum disorder are fully included or spend part of their day in mainstream classes.  Their needs will continue to change as new skills are acquired, as they move from childhood to the teenage years, and as environments, expectations, and demands change.   And this means monitoring their growth and progress and making changes to their educational program as needed.

The focus always needs to be on today, yet planning for tomorrow and the many transition points, both small and large, means ensuring that school is building a strong foundation and that you're keeping a keen and careful eye on what's coming next.  Remember...keep the bar high. 

2.  College

If you think college isn't a possibility, think again.  More and more colleges and universities are creating programs to support students with autism spectrum disorders and many have added supports as well.  And while it may seem like a long way off, the transition requires carefully planning and preparation...starting now.

If higher education, whether community college or a four-year university, may be the goal, their transition plan must address it.   And this means IEP goals that go far beyond:  "Megan will research post-secondary education options" or "Tim will visit two colleges".   Preparation for college means direct instruction of skills including self-advocacy and executive function skills (e.g. organization, time management), not only in their transition plan, but in measurable IEP goals as well.

If colleges are already being explored, plan to evaluate each school's disability services department.  Some families disclose their child's disability before acceptance, while others wait until acceptance and after the college decision has been made.  No matter the path, you need to access all available information to determine the right "fit" for your child.

3.  Work

The need for parents to think about and plan for the transition from school to employment and to evaluate a child's interests and abilities must begin early - i.e. middle school. 

Many companies, such as EY & Microsoft, are recruiting employees with ASD, and smaller businesses are specifically hiring young adults with these needs and strengths.  School must be teaching the skills needed for independence, and employment is one of the key areas.

Finally...

Parents already know that one day, perhaps sooner than expected, school will end and so will the services and supports received.  Whether college is the next step or securing a job, both areas have different rules and expectations, requiring skills that go beyond getting a B on a spelling test or doing well on a science project.

Preparation is key.  And we all have a part to play -- families, schools, clinicians, agencies, colleges, employers, and more.

Children with autism spectrum disorders become adults.  They become part of the fabric of our world with astonishing strengths and gifts to share.  And they also become adults with needs that continue to require support.

April may be Autism Awareness Month, but we'll really be integrating those with autism spectrum disorders into every aspect of life when the awareness is ongoing.  That's when we'll know that it no longer requires 30 days of focus and attention.

 

Trust Me...It's A Crisis

I've always struggled with numbers but not this one... From the CDC comes this statistic - 1 in 50 children under the age of 17 holds an autism diagnosis.  Even for me, someone who has worked with parents of children with autism for years and suspected for quite some time that even the most recent statistic of 1 in 88 children was low, seeing this in print was simply startling.

Ask anyone whose life has been touched by autism and they'll tell you that it changes everything.  It strains marriages and finances.  Overwhelms resources and time.  Shifts priorities and plans.  Every day, in every possible way, autism overtakes life and the expression ..."let me count the ways" doesn't even scratch the surface in terms of the impact an autism spectrum disorder has on parents, families and well beyond.  Trust me, I know.

At a time when school budgets are being slashed and families are truly hurting by an aching economy, these numbers equate to a huge wake-up call for those who may have been napping.  The need for early intervention services is critical as the earlier supports and services are secured, the greater likelihood that the child can make and sustain progress.  The need for broader and more complex supports for teens has never been greater with social deficits and bullying defining a huge part of life for high school students.  And the need for college-level support is enormous, as the expectations and freedom that accompany the foray into young adult independence brings with it enormous risks.  Trust me, I know.

Working parents have the greatest challenges and if both parents are employed full-time outside of the home or if it's a single parent household, all bets are off.  Therapies, evaluations, research, school meetings, crisis situations...the strain on working parents and their time, finances, and health are beyond what employers and colleagues understand or even recognize. And as I say ad nauseum...behind every child with an autism spectrum disorder is a parent (or two parents) of a child with an autism spectrum disorder.  Trust me, I know.

Autism is complex and multi-faceted, leaving even the most "on" parents buckling under the strain.   Parents find themselves leaving jobs because any hope of work/life balance is greatly compromised if not impossible.  Parents find themselves on Google at 3 a.m. or spending weekends sifting through books and journals.  Parents find themselves remortgaging their homes, borrowing from family members, and altering their way of life beyond what those on the outside could fathom.   Trust me, I know.

Autism is a crisis.  Plain and simple.  It was a crisis five years ago and is even moreso today.  And while many are researching causes and developing new therapies, the reality is that exploding numbers of children and teens are struggling on this very day from wake-up in the morning to sleep (if sleep even happens) at night, in 2nd Grade and 11th Grade, in public schools and private schools.  And standing behind and beside each of these children is a worn, overwhelmed, frustrated, and confused parent - or two parents - trying in herculean ways to find answers and make things better.  Trust me, I know.

When a crisis hits, people mobilize.  Only in this case, it isn't a natural disaster but rather a national crisis impacting not only families in their own homes, but employers as well.  Employers must offer assistance, whether through flexible work options, funds allocated for an employee to use for therapies, private school, or legal counsel, or employee resource groups so working parents can share information and offer support.  Because even with internet research in the middle of the night, what working parent with an 8 or 14-year-old with Asperger's Syndrome has the time or energy to shoulder more than they already are?  Employers also need to recognize that today's children with an autism spectrum disorder will likely be tomorrow's employees programming their computer system or writing their corporate manual.  And in terms of society, everyone needs to begin to understand autism differently, for many pre-conceived notions from years ago are as outdated as go-go boots and wall telephones.

One in 50 children has autism.  It impacts everyone and is a genuine crisis.  Trust me, I know.

 

 

Work Or Family...It's All About Relationships

The similarities between workplaces and families are striking. There's the leader or the parent... unproductive staff meetings or holiday gatherings where few people are happy...employees doing more with less or limits on eating out... disengaged employees or family strife with teenagers.

If you really think about it, the one key difference between the workplace and the family is that workplaces pay their employees for the work they do whereas family members pay - in many ways - just for being part of the family.

I just read an article in Forbes entitled "Why Are So Many Employees Disengaged" and the research study cited concludes that the #1 reason is the relationship with the employee's supervisor, costing employers $11 billion annually in employee turnover.  No surprise here, because we know that the attitudes and actions of the person/people at the top frame the experiences of everyone else.  Whether at work or home, it all boils down to the human level or, relationships.

When we look at top workplaces and companies striving for "best places to work" status, we often look at things like professional development, benefits or "perks," or advancement opportunities as the core drivers.  No question these things help keep employees happy and may be easier to measure, but it's the intangibles - often referred to as the softer, "feel good" things - that make for those workplaces and families we'd like to call our own or strive to create.

Relationships are built on people feeling listened to, respected, involved, and appreciated.  It's sustained when everyone feels "part of" and knows - deep down at a personal level - that they're a needed cog in the wheel to move things forward.  It's not surprising at all that the key issue related to disengagement involves the relationships (or lack thereof) of the people who are most closely aligned.  Rather, the question to be asked is what's being done to improve these fractured or non-existent relationships and is it a priority?

The workplace defines what people do.  Families define who people are.  Each revolves around relationships ... more complex and harder to quantify, but enviable if you don't have them and fortunate if you do.  Whether at work or at home, it's the quality of the relationships of the people involved that makes all the difference.   As a proverb says, "No road is long with good company."